Vulnerability hits Intel enterprise PCs going back 10 years

Intel is reporting a firmware vulnerability that could let attackers take over remote management functions on computers built over nearly the past decade.

The vulnerability, disclosed on Monday, affects features in Intel firmware that are designed for enterprise IT management.  

Enterprises using Intel Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology and Intel Standard Manageability on their systems should patch them as soon as possible, the company says.

The vulnerable firmware features can be found in some current Core processors and all the way back to Intel’s first-generation Core, called Nehalem, which shipped in 2008. They’re part of versions 6.0 through 11.6 of Intel’s manageability firmware.

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Home-sharing sites are targeting business travellers

BUSINESS travel accounts for about a third of total travel spending in America, according to the United States Travel Association, an industry group. But Airbnb, a private firm which is probably the world’s second most valuable hospitality provider after Marriott, gets less than 10% of its business from people travelling for work. As the San Francisco-based company continues to expand, it’s pretty clear whom it will be targeting.

This week Airbnb is rolling out a new tool specifically for business travellers to book home rentals. All listings deemed “Business Travel Ready” (BTR) feature free Wi-Fi, a desk, soap, shampoo, a hairdryer, an iron and check-in with a doorman (or a digital lock). In other words, all the basic amenities of a hotel. The tool also allows companies to track their spending, receive invoices directly, and manage employees’ itineraries.

Even if it is still principally for vacationers, Airbnb has seen a surge in…Continue reading

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US bill aims to quash Open Internet Order, prevent its return

A bill introduced Monday by some U.S. senators aims to repeal net neutrality rules under the Federal Communications Commission’s 2015 Open Internet Order, and ban the agency from issuing similar regulations in the future.

The legislation aims to give some permanence to recent moves by the Republican-dominated FCC to repeal provisions of the 2015 order. There are concerns that if the FCC at some point comes under the control of Democrats, it will promptly restore the rules under the 2015 Open Internet Order.

The Restoring Internet Freedom Act was introduced by Senator Mike Lee, a Republican from Utah, and is cosponsored by eight other Republicans including Ted Cruz, senator for Texas, and Rand Paul, senator for Kentucky.

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Lessons from a flight gone wrong

It’s the stuff corporate nightmares are made of. The video of Dr. David Dao being dragged off United Express Flight 3411 on April 9, 2017, his face bloodied, quickly went viral. People (read: potential customers) questioned why a passenger who was already seated and held a proper boarding pass would be forcibly removed to make space for an airline employee.

Social media feeds were swamped with bitter commentary. Ad parodies included the taglines “We beat our competitors … not our customers” and “The only things we pull out of the plane are your two free checked bags.” Jimmy Kimmel, Ellen DeGeneres and other entertainers had a field day. Down the road, the incident is likely to become a business school case study about how to turn a routine situation into a crisis.

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Vulnerability hits Intel enterprise PCs going back 10 years

Intel is reporting a firmware vulnerability that could let attackers take over remote management functions on computers built over nearly the past decade.

The vulnerability, disclosed on Monday, affects features in Intel firmware that are designed for enterprise IT management.  

Enterprises using Intel Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology and Intel Standard Manageability on their systems should patch them as soon as possible, the company says.

The vulnerable firmware features can be found in some current Core processors and all the way back to Intel’s first-generation Core, called Nehalem, which shipped in 2008. They’re part of versions 6.0 through 11.6 of Intel’s manageability firmware.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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